Graphology at Home - Lesson 15 - Your Signature

Published: 09th September 2008
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Though the woman in Figure 14 did sign her name with the title "Mrs.," it and her husband's last name are small in comparison to her own given name. She is prouder of herself than of her husband...


The signature gives graphologists a great deal of information, much more than any other part of a subject's handwriting. The signature is the ego, but it goes beyond this point. The body of the writing represents what the writer really is, whereas the signature shows what he would like you to think he is.

If the body of the writing is similar to that of the signature, we see an essentially honest and straightforward individual-one that is not trying to impress others or play a false part. When the signature varies from the body of the writing, graphologists first analyze the body of the writing, to discover what the writer really is. Then they check that against the signature to get an impression of the writer's persona-the role he is trying to play.

Picture the body of writing that is vertical, showing a cool approach toward people in general. The inclined signature implies anything but coolness. The writer wants you to think that he is warmer than he really is.

By contrast, imagine the body of writing to be inclined (warm), whereas the signature is upright (cool). This person is warm and sensitive, but would prefer you to think of him as more indifferent than he really is.

Consider simplified writing that displays an artistic signature. The writer, a person of simple tastes, would like you to think he is artistic.

Picture the large writing of the main body with a tiny signature. The great capital I would indicate how highly the writer thinks of himself. This writer is far from being humble, but his tiny signature shows that he wants you to think he is.

When a person holds an image in his mind of someone he respects or likes, he tends to make that person's appearance larger than it actually is. The opposite is also true: lack of respect for someone makes him reduce the image in size. These images are shown in his writing.

When the writer addresses the addressee and this name shrinks in size in comparison to the body of the writing, this writer has low esteem for this person.

When the body of the writing is smaller than the name of the addressee, the writer has a high regard for this person.

When the addressee's name is unclear, yet the body of the writing is quite legible, the writer is confused, not sure of how he feels about this person.

Should the addressee's name be "wiped out," the writer would love to get rid of this person somehow or other.

Picture the writer's own name written much larger than that of the addressee. This writer thinks much more of himself than he does of the addressee.

The way a man signs his first name indicates what the writer thinks of himself. The way he signs his surname hints at his feeling toward his family-particularly his father, since the surname does represent him.

When both names are equal in size, he demonstrates an equal regard for himself as an individual and for his family. When there is a variation, the writer is portraying how he feels about his relationship with his family.

Imagine the first name written larger than the surname. The writer is more involved in his own affairs than concerned with being part of his family.

Picture the surname written larger than the first name. This writer considers his family first and thinks of himself as part of it, rather than as an individual on his own.

When the capitals of both first name and surname are large and relatively even, it shows a person who is proud of his family as well as of himself:

As the following examples explain, a woman's writing often demonstrates her opinion of her husband.

When a woman signs herself with the title "Mrs.," and writes her husband's name in a large hand, she is very proud of her husband.

When a wife writes her title and husband's last name quite large in comparison to her own given name, she thinks much more highly of her husband than she does of herself.

When a wife signs her title "Mrs." and her husband's last name comparatively small to her own given name, she is prouder of herself than of her husband.

When a married woman does not write her title of marriage at all, and in addition, she writes her own given name much larger than her husband's name, it indicates she has little regard for her husband.

Examination for Lesson 15

1. The body of the writing reflects what the writer is. What does the signature show?

2. When one's signature discloses being proud of his family as well as himself, what is

consistent between the first name and the surname?

Answers for Lesson 15

1. The signature shows what he would like you to think he is.

2. The capitals of both first name and surname are large and relatively even.




About The Author:


Joel Engel is the author of "Handwriting Analysis Self-Taught" (Penguin Books)
http://careertest.ws
http://www.learngraphology.com

If you would like to view the images to this article, please send a blank email to engraph@netvision.net.il


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